32 Degrees?

2014-02-23 17:14:17.000 – Samuel Hewitt,  Summit Intern

Our 7:00 PM observation Friday revealed that the summit temperature rose above the freezing mark for the first time since January 13th. Although the average temperature for this time of year is in the mid-single digits, it is still hard to believe that we have remained below freezing for the last 38 days! The last time the temperature remained under 32 degrees for more than 38 consecutive days was from January 28th – March 6th, 2012. The “mild” conditions were short lived however, as temperatures remained above freezing for roughly one hour before dropping back into the teens in wake of a cold front.

Unfortunately, it appears as though the cold weather won’t be going anywhere any time soon. During the upcoming week, a series of cold fronts will cross New England, each ushering in a progressively colder air mass. The latest model runs suggest that the summit temperature will drop below zero early tomorrow morning and potentially stay that way through the end of the week. However, as the days (potential sunlight hours) continue to get longer and the sun’s angle in the sky continues to become larger, it is only a matter of time before temperatures begin to rise again. After all, spring is just around the corner, right?

This winter sure has been a long one and I look forward to warmer days!

 

Samuel Hewitt,  Summit Intern

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