A Christmas Miracle

2010-12-26 16:15:26.000 – Brian Clark,  Observer and Meteorologist

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It’s a Christmas miracle! The storm that just a few days ago looked as though it was going to harmlessly turn out to sea and have little impact on our weather is now taking dead aim at New England. The worst of the storm in terms of snow accumulations will be closer to the coast than we are. In fact, Boston will likely see accumulations of 12-18 inches with the possibility for as much as two feet.

Here on the summit, we will also see a nice amount of snow, with 8-12 inches likely. The bigger story with this storm, for us at least, looks to be the wind. By tomorrow, winds will be gusting near 100 mph, and then tomorrow night and early Tuesday winds will peak with sustained readings around 100 mph with gusts even higher than that.

Making this storm all that more exciting is the fact that this is going to be our first major storm of the winter. Yes, we’ve had a few 100+ mph gusts so far this winter, but none of those came from what would be considered a widespread, major storm (as strange as that may sound). Also, this storm could put us very close to our average snowfall for the month of December, with just under a week left before we turn the page on the calendar.

Undoubtedly, we will be writing about the storm in the Observer Comments here on our website, and you can keep an eye on current conditions on the Weather page. Also, if you haven’t already, ‘like’ our page on Facebook for even more updates and pictures!

 

Brian Clark,  Observer and Meteorologist

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