A few words from Marty

2012-08-07 18:43:40.000 – Marty,  Summit Cat

Courtisy of my good friend Chris Gregg

I don’t get to write an Observer Comment very often even though I do more observing on the Summit than any of the “Official” Weather Observers. I observe the Interns giving tours, I observe the Weather Observers observing the weather, I observe the sunrises and sunsets, I observe the tourists coming and going – That’s a lot of observing, no wonder I’m exhausted all the time and have to find a nice spot to sleep.

I hear some of the Observers talking and I think they’re jealous that I get more “likes” on our Facebook page when my picture is posted than even the nicest sunrise. The Weather Observers that come and go each Wednesday just don’t seem to understand that I’m the only full time resident of the Summit that people can count on to be here when they come for a tour of the Observatory. I know that when folks come to visit sometimes I’m nowhere to be found however my adoring public just has to understand that keeping the Summit clear of mice, chipmunks and flying squirrels single handedly is a big job and I do need to get my beauty sleep. I look so quit in pictures if I do say so myself.

Tomorrow is going to be a very sad day for me as my newest friends, Interns Adam and Chris will be headed down for the last time and headed back to school. I really enjoyed having them up hear this summer. I don’t want to say the twice daily grooming that Adam and Chris gave me had any impact on how I feel about them however I’ll surely miss the two of you so please come back to visit me when you can.

Observer Footnote: The next program in our “Science in the Mountains: A Passport to Science” is tonight (Wednesday) at 7pm. Tonight topic is about the Research Projects at Tin Mountain Conservation Center. The program is FREE to all ages. More information can be found here: http://www.mountwashington.org/education/science_in_the_mountains/

 

Marty,  Summit Cat

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