Arrivederci, Snow!

2013-04-19 15:00:29.000 – Mike Carmon,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

Free Flowing!

The great melt-out on the summit has commenced!

With temperatures soaring into the 40s today, all of the snow and ice that has built up in recent months is quickly reducing itself to lots of streams of flowing water.

Quite a bit of rain, with perhaps a few thunderstorms, are expected tonight, which could exacerbate the already-building problem of: where will the water go? In an effort to stave off any flooding that could occur in our building, the staff has worked extra hard today to make sure that water is freely flowing downhill and away from our mountaintop station. In some cases, this has meant digging through feet of snow to create man-made trenches which we refer to as water bars.

These water bars will permit melting snow (and eventually rainfall) to flow freely away from the building, instead of into it.

Now that our arms are tired from digging out all of this snow and ice, we can kick back, relax, and wait to see what kind of interesting weather comes our way tonight.

 

Mike Carmon,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

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