Back in Action

2012-11-28 23:40:37.000 – Mike Carmon,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

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After three weeks away from work, one can certainly gain a whole new perspective.

I expected to return from vacation to a summit caked in rime ice and snow, with drifts towering over my head abounding, and a dusted-off Snow Cat.

However, much to my surprise, the Auto Road was only slightly coated with the wintry whiteness, and the large drifts were nowhere to be found as we ascended in the truck and 4×4 van (Not Snow Cat, but NO Cat) early this morning.

The promise of winter is in the forecast for the next few days as an Alberta Clipper system blasts through overnight Thursday into Friday, possibly dumping a few inches of snow and ramping up summit wind speeds!

Will the system right the ship of winter thenceforth? It does not look like it. As the jet stream bows northward early next week, warm air will advance on the eastern two-thirds of the U.S., bringing with it a mild start to the month of December. Rain on the summit on December 2nd? Yes, it is possible at this time.

One thing is for sure though–after three weeks away, I am excited to delve back into the world of observing Mt. Washington’s weather, as no two shifts are ever the same, and it keeps summit life quite interesting for this weather nerd!

Observer footnote: Our year-end fund drive is taking place through December 31, and we need your support. Please make a tax-deductible donation of any amount here. As a nonprofit, people-powered institution since our founding in 1932, we need your help to continue our work! Thank you in advance for your generosity.

 

Mike Carmon,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

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