Baseball

2009-04-19 15:23:27.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

Extreme baseball!

There’s no crying in baseball!

The famous line uttered by Tom Hanks in the feel-good movie A League of Their Own. Well, as a girl who absolutely loves baseball, this is one of my all time favorite movies. I confess, I am not a Boston fan. Even though I’m from New Jersey, I’m neither a Mets nor a Yankees fan. Instead, I’m a Cleveland Indians fan, and am thrilled to announce that last night the Indians absolutely demolished the Yankees: 22-4. Go Cleveland!

Anyway, baseball season has begun, not only in real life, but also on the summit. Today’s gorgeous weather was conducive to hiking and skiing (unlike yesterday’s weather for the Inferno). After spending all day, except observations, inside doing paperwork, I was itching to do something outside. The sun was shining; there were few clouds in the sky and even less wind. I literally couldn’t sit still during the tedious task of coding the synoptic observation. As soon as that was complete, I jumped up and went to the recreation drawer, pulled out two baseball gloves and a baseball.

It’s been quite some time since I’ve played catch on the summit. In fact, the last time was with long gone observer Kyle Paddleford about a year ago. We lost that ball…

Anyway, after forty five minutes of throwing the ball back and forth, having casual conversation with the hikers and skiers, and showing Jordan that I do not, in fact, throw like a girl (no offense ladies!), it was time to do another observation. During those forty five minutes, a particularly bouncy ball hit me in the face and tears involuntarily sprung to my eyes. No serious injuries were sustained, but “There’s no crying in baseball!” screamed in my head. Even though I now sport a fancy fat lip, I can’t help but be ridiculously light hearted with another beautiful day in store for tomorrow.

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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