Big Wind Day!!!

2007-04-12 07:13:19.000 – Jim Salge,  Observer

Big Slide in Tuckerman Ravine

Seventy three years ago today, the legend of Mount Washington was carved into the stone of this rugged peak. At just past 1PM, the gales from the southeast gathered into what today still stands as the strongest surface wind speed ever recorded, as a 231 mph wind gust buffeted the peak.

As a weather observer at the ‘Home of the World’s Worst Weather,’ I often feel humbled by the power of the nature as it exists on this mountain. It’s a sobering thought to remind yourself that every developing storm in the long range outlooks could bring out conditions that could top this record, or write its way into history in some other extreme way. But our present crew also can’t help but also feel humbled by the legacy of the station, and the hardships that the early crews endured to begin the early work at the Mount Washington Observatory. Recording the world record wind was no easy feat for the early staff, and you can read about the event here!

Big Wind Day is a day of celebration on the summit, and the last Edutrip of the season is slated to come up and celebrate with us. And whereas last week’s shift got ‘bunny cake’ on Easter, our volunteer has promised to dig into her creative mind to work on a ‘Big Wind Cake’!!!

Today’s weather, though not comparable, is certainly going to be rather severe in its own right. Light snow has begun, and a significant late season snowfall is in the cards today as winds should increase to hurricane force. Perhaps most notable though, is what this additional snowfall will do to the slopes in avalanche terrain. The above picture was taken from our premium content zoom camera yesterday, showing a LARGE fracture line in Tuckerman Ravine yesterday. As full on wintry conditions are slated to continue on the peak right through the weekend, please check the avalanche report when planning your upcoming recreation on the slopes.

 

Jim Salge,  Observer

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