Bike Race and Sun Rays…

2008-08-16 07:01:50.000 – Jim Salge,  Temporary Observer

Rain Showers and Sun Rays…

This morning is the annual Mount Washington Bicycle Hillclimb, where 600 riders will challenge themselves to one of the toughest climbs in the world. The race, 7.6 miles long, averages a 12% grade and reaches 22% near the top, a treat for tired riders. Every year, it’s a coin toss (or weather conditions toss) as to whether the runners or the bikers will set a faster winning time, leading to the conclusion that there is little mechanical advantage to the wheel on Mount Washington.

The weather this morning is nearly perfect for the race, which was cancelled last year due to inclimate weather. Light winds, 45 degrees at the top, and showers, though visible from the summit, are remaining off to the east. While out observing these showers, a few breaks in the clouds allowed for some sun spotlighting, yielding the scene above … a real treat for those up early to meet the racers at the top.

We have been lucky with light in the past 24 hours, as last nights sunset also allowed some light to break the clouds. Everyone, including Marty, our cat, was out enjoying the brief break in the otherwise cloudy afternoon. Marty is a tough cat to photograph…dark, quick, and a mane that he likes to bury his face into. For a brief second at sunset though last night, he hopped on a cairn in front of my lens…with pleasing results.

Good luck to all the riders today!

 

Jim Salge,  Temporary Observer

Overview of Lapse Rate Research

May 20th, 2024|0 Comments

Overview of Lapse Rate Research By Karl Philippoff As a weather observer and research specialist on top of Mount Washington, in addition to my usual observer duties such as taking hourly observations, releasing forecasts,

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

May 9th, 2024|Comments Off on Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast’s Highest Peak

Deadline Driven: The 12-Hour Shifts that Power Weather Forecasting from the Northeast's Highest Peak By Wendy Almeida  As a new member of the Mount Washington Observatory team, I wanted to gain a deeper understanding

Find Older Posts