Boooooring

2010-02-05 00:12:11.000 – Mike Carmon,  Staff Meteorologist

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While the weather to the south remains quite active, New Englanders will suffer from a streak of relatively tame conditions.

A few surface high pressure areas will pass through New England over the next week or so, and, along with the proper upper-level dynamics, will provide dry conditions and relatively average temperatures through this time period. There will be no major fluctuations in temperatures, no major precipitation events, and we will even struggle to muddle the sky with clouds! The National Weather Service forecast for northern NH expresses that high temperatures will range in the low to mid 20s through next Thursday, with the only chance of clouds and snow coming briefly on Sunday afternoon (the chance for snow at this time is 30%). Although it is important to remember that, beyond three days out, an exorbitant amount of confidence should not be placed in the details of any forecast. But at this time, it does not appear that there will be any major changes.

It will definitely NOT be a week of significant weather events in the valley, to be sure. Although we will see some occasional fog on the summit, there are no noteworthy precipitation or wind events in the near future either. Although this will make the forecasting aspect of my job much less demanding, I am still an individual that craves extreme weather. So about now, I’m becoming nostalgic (or impatient, if you prefer) for the dramatic summertime thunderstorms.

Finally, to completely change the subject…one of our seasoned veteran observers, Stacey Kawecki, will be celebrating her day of birth on the summit today, February 5th. She will be turning the tender age of…well, this is a touchy subject, and I might get in trouble for sharing that information, so I will refrain. Happy Birthday!

 

Mike Carmon,  Staff Meteorologist

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