Change in Weather

2011-11-10 17:25:30.000 – David Narkewicz,  Summit Intern

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It was a very nice surprise to get some abnormally warm temperatures over my last off shift. I expected that it would be one of the last time this Fall I was going to see warmer temperatures in the Northeast. Therefore I took full advantage of the conditions and enjoyed some outdoor activities with friends. Even on the summit yesterday the weather was pleasant. It always makes shift change easier when the weather is cooperating with mild temperatures and winds with clear skies.

These conditions did not extend into today though as the summit was engulfed in clouds. Cloudy conditions are going to continue for at least the next day with temperatures plummeting from the upper 30s to around 10 degrees by tomorrow night. Tomorrow winds are also expected to pick up greatly with the models showing a potential to reach around 90 mph with higher gusts. Some precipitation is also expected as this cold front moves overhead. As temperatures drop, it will cause this precipitation to become a little messy. Precipitation will transition from rain to snow with some freezing rain and sleet mixing in.

Over the past few upcoming shifts I have noticed a common trend. It seems as Mother Nature likes to grace my shift with enjoyable conditions for Wednesdays shift change but then turn the nasty weather switch on for the following day. It is Mother Nature’s way of saying ‘Hi, are ready for a fun week?’ Every morning and night the observatory composes and records a 36 hour higher summits weather outlook. If you have not listened to one yet you can find them by click the Weather tab on the Mount Washington Observatory website. On the right hand side of the page there are separate links for the summit report produced in the morning and evening of each day.

 

David Narkewicz,  Summit Intern

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