Change is on the way

2008-04-27 20:37:53.000 – Brian Clark,  Observer

The weather recently has been…well…unexciting to be honest. Of course, having the opportunity to live and work on Mount Washington certainly changes one’s definition of exciting weather. Regardless, we have spent much more time in the clear than we have in the fog. Of course, anyone that knows anything about Mount Washington knows that this is truly unusual. At least yesterday I got to take advantage of the clear, calm, and rather warm weather. After being stuck inside all week because I had come down with a cold and was not feeling well, I was finally feeling well enough to get out for some skiing. I headed over to Airplane Gully on the Great Gulf headwall to experience that run for the first time. It was definitely nice to get out for some hiking, fresh air, and skiing.

Change is on the way however. Low pressure will move up the St. Lawrence River Valley through the day tomorrow, bringing some steady rain with it tomorrow night. A secondary low is then forecasted to develop in the Gulf of Maine. This will begin to feed colder air back onto the summit and bring a good chance of some sort of frozen and/or freezing precipitation on the tail end of the storm. It is hard to tell at this point exactly how much and what kind of frozen/freezing precipitation we may get, but no matter what ends up happening, I am looking forward to the change.

Oh, there was one record that was broken today. Today was the first time since Steve started here in October that I have taken seconds at dinner and he hasn’t. Big day!

 

Brian Clark,  Observer

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