Changeable Weather on the Summit

2014-10-13 18:50:00.000 – Mike Dorfman, Weather Observer/IT Specialist

 

Today displayed Mount Washington’s variable weather at its best.I woke up to a beautiful sunrise under completely clear skies.Doing observations through the day, there were some high level clouds filtering in, but they didn’t even cover 1/8th of the sky.Just after noontime, I saw low level clouds in the distance.As I watched over the span of 30 minutes or so, I could see lenticulars forming closer and closer to the summit.Shortly after they began to form over the Northern Presidential Range, the cloud base lowered and we were suddenly in the fog.So in this span of 30 minutes, we went from nearly completely clear to back into the fog.This just shows how quickly the weather can change here on the summit, turning a beautiful, sunny day into foggy, windy, and bitter conditions in less than an hour!

Today is a good example of why we add disclaimer at the top of our Higher Summits Forecast page.It reads, “Mountain weather is subject to rapid changes and extreme conditions. Always be prepared to make your own assessment of travel and weather conditions. This outlook is one tool to help you plan a safe trip. Always travel with adequate clothing, shelter, food, and water.”

Lastly, we’re working on a new website!The new site will include a more detailed Current Summit Conditions page, new HD webcam images, and a 48-hour Higher Summits forecast (an extension to the current 36-hour product that we put out).So keep your eyes peeled for the new release in the coming weeks!

 

Mike Dorfman, Weather Observer/IT Specialist

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