Climb to the Clouds

2014-06-29 18:29:24.000 – Tom Padham,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

Slim Bryant’s car departing the summit

Today was the 110th anniversary of the Subaru Mt. Washington Hill Climb (aka Climb to the Clouds), a timed-automobile race up the steep and winding 7.6 mile Mt. Washington Auto Road. This year’s race was the largest in the history of the event, which first started in 1904, with 80 cars vying for the fastest time up the Northeast’s highest peak. Luckily the weather remained dry for the event, with warm temperatures for this time of year in the upper 50s on the summit. After the first of two runs, all of the cars lined up for pictures, with many of the drivers stopping to chat with the people who came out to watch the event. A few pictures of the racing cars on the summit can be found here and here.

With the race complete around 5pm today, the results are in. With a new record time of 6:09.09, David Higgins and co-driver Craig Drew won the race! Shortly behind Higgins was driver Travis Pastrana, who had a time of 6:12.29, and driver Paul Tingaud finished third with a time of 6:22.70. Both Higgins and Pastrana drove a 2013 Subaru WRX STi, with Tingaud driving an Audi SuperChicken. Our very own snowcat operator Slim Bryant raced his 1985 Porsche 944, finishing with a personal best time of 7:57.32. Congratulations to all of the racers and thanks to all who participated!

 

Tom Padham,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

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