Cold Weather and Media Attention

2008-11-21 17:56:25.000 – Brian Clark,  Observer

A brief break in the fog today

As expected, the unseasonable cold has continued on the summit today. So far, we have reached a maximum temperature of 0.9 degrees above zero and we certainly aren’t going to top that this evening; the temperature has been falling the last 5 hours or so and will continue to do so through the night. In fact, there is a good chance that by tomorrow morning we challenge the record low for November 22. Right now, that record is 11 below zero set back in 1987. Winds are also expected to pick up significantly tomorrow into Sunday with sustained speeds between 65 and 85 miles per hour with higher gusts, likely exceeding the century mark.

Although such winds speeds are not unusual for this time of year, the combination of the temperatures and the wind is. Wind chills tomorrow night and Sunday morning will be at dangerous levels, somewhere in the range of 50-60 below zero. Those are wind chill values that are much more typical of January than late November!

This unseasonable weather has gotten us a bit of media attention, as it often does. WMUR Channel 9 out of Manchester, NH called today looking for some photos and a phone interview, which will likely air on the news this evening and tonight.

We also got a call from national media today that I think just a few of you reading this might be familiar with: The Weather Channel. This afternoon and evening we filmed some video clips for the them and sent them a bunch of still photos as well. Tomorrow morning, this footage and pictures, along with a live interview of me, will air on a show called Weekend View. This show runs from 7 to 11 a.m. with the segment about Mount Washington and the Observatory most likely showing between 10 and 11 a.m. (I won’t know what time for sure until tomorrow morning).

This kind of publicity is always exciting for us. Be sure to catch the segment if you can!

Note: credit for the attached photo goes to this week’s volunteer, Ed O’Malley.

 

Brian Clark,  Observer

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