Contrasting colors

2009-09-26 16:08:38.000 – Brian Clark,  Observer and Meteorologist

Colors starting to pop in the north

Fall is a great time of year, in my opinion, both on and off the mountain. One of my favorite things about fall on the mountain is the difference between the colors on the summit and the colors showing up in the valley. All the alpine vegetation here on the summit, by this time in the year, has turned back to its usual shades of brown (it’s only green for a month or so during the summer). This is contrasted by the shades of yellow, red, and orange of the changing leaves in the valley. Then, when we get some snow or rime ice during this time of year, this contrast in color (and in seasons for that matter) becomes even more evident. This was the case yesterday after the fog cleared out.

The taste of winter we had yesterday will be quickly forgotten tomorrow. An approaching low pressure system will overspread the region with a steady rain and temperatures will rise into the low to mid 40’s. All that will surely melt the last bits of ice left from yesterday, still hanging on for dear life on the shady sides of rocks as well as the Observatory tower.

Not to worry though. There is still a couple weeks of color left in the valley and the chance of rime and snow on the summit will only get better in that time as well!

 

Brian Clark,  Observer and Meteorologist

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