Creepy nights

2008-01-24 15:02:35.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer

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“So you’re working nights this week?”

This is what Kyle asked me yesterday afternoon. I figured, since I haven’t ever worked nights, and since he’s been working them since December, I’d give him a break and begin my night time adventure. So far, everything is ok. There is definitely something to it when those night observers talk about how eerie it can be at night though. Nothing particularly scary happened last night, but when I went out to get the precip can, at 0030 EST, my imagination started to run away. Walking through the empty rotunda, I could hear every footstep, and unable to help myself, I glanced at the painted picture of Lizzie Bourne. At this point, I felt butterflies; not the happy, excited kind. I walked outside, and the absence of generator noise was another layer. Next, as I rounded the corner of the building, and became exposed to the winds, I heard a howling noise, jumped, and frantically searched for the source. After taking a deep breath, I realized it was the wind moving over the opening on the precip can. Throw murky fog into the mix, and those butterflies in my stomach quickly turned to jumping beans doing the polka. Needless to say, I was pretty relieved when I reached to weather room again. The nice, brightly lit with music playing weather room.

Hopefully by the end of the week one of two things will happen. Either I’ll get used to the eerie quiet of the night, or something really scary will happen, and I’ll have an even better story to share with everyone!

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer

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