Facebook

2009-05-06 22:17:29.000 – Ryan Knapp,  Staff Meteorologist

“Are you on Facebook?”

If you are on Facebook, I am sure you have muttered this question at least once to a friend, coworker or family member. If they are, you usually ask to friend them, if they are not, most people follow up with “Well, why not?” A year ago, I was usually on the side of explaining why I had not yet signed up but after a while, I got sick of trying to explain myself and caved in. I was hesitant at first but now, I have found it a great way in keeping in touch with family, friends from high school/college, bands, shows, or best of all, organizations on and around Mount Washington.

But before I get sidetracked, let me catch those who do not read the news paper, watch the news, have teens, tweens, or twentysomething in their household, or explore the internet much. Facebook is what is called a social networking site that allows users to connect through messaging, status updates, pictures, videos, and many other ways. All one does is go to the page, sign up, then start setting up their profile and seek out people and organizations you know. You then add them or become fans of their causes and everytime you log in, you will come to a status update page where you can find out new information updated on their page.

I mention this as today, it was through Facebook that I found out some information about the autoroad, of which I am subscribed to. They updated their status today to inform subscribers that the road will be open to half way for private autos this Saturday, May 9 at 9 am (for more information go here). I am sure we would have found this out in one way or another but it gave us a jump on the information. Similarly, our own organization, the Mount Washington Observatory, uses our Facebook page to inform subscribers to going ons in the organization without having to daily check our newsfeed daily. Although it will never be on par with the connection our Observer Comments provide with you, it is another way to stay connected with the organization.

 

Ryan Knapp,  Staff Meteorologist

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