Fog

2010-10-30 20:28:38.000 – Erica Sandschulte,  Summit Intern

Rime ice formed by frozen fog

It’s white. It has a relative humidity near 100%. It can reduce visibility to zero. Take one guess…Fog. It is briefed about in comments quite often because it is a common weather phenomenon in winter up here. In fact, the summit stays in the fog over 60% in an entire year. Fog is made up of tiny droplets of water that are so small that it would take millions of them to make a single tablespoonful of water! Or if you take piece of string, cut off one inch, and then cut it into a thousand pieces, that would be just how small a water droplet size is. Now, cutting a thousand tiny pieces of string is almost impossible but it gives you an idea of just how small those guys are.

Throughout the day, we have recorded fog observations as well as several other things. For example: we have recorded just over an inch of snowfall (as of 8pm EST), light snow grains, light snow, riming, and blowing snow. The blowing snow was a result from the winds that have been between 30-55mph and from the west. Nothing out of the ordinary, but it creates some excitement. On our website you can find weather updates, check webcams from around the summit, as well as listen to morning and evening outlooks. If you would like to listen to the morning or evening outlooks (which are valuable when planning a hike) they are located under the’ Multimedia’ tab on the top of our web-page. Cheers!

 

Erica Sandschulte,  Summit Intern

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