God bless Canada.

2010-01-23 17:39:51.000 – Drew Hill,  Summit Intern

Sublimation sculpts sinewy rime at sunset.

I love Canada.

Don’t get me wrong, I’m a bonafide American– a patriot with a capital ”P”– but this Canadian high pressure system has got me singing the highest praises for the maple leaves. As anyone who has been in New England these past couple of days already knows, this warm, dry airmass has brought us several picture-perfect days. You’d think I’d be uncomfortable with beyond-100-yard visibility and wind chills that average above zero, but I’m enjoying it. Thoroughly.

Thursday began with a sunrise that was Un.Real. After a quick bask in my new favorite (secret) spot, I headed in for breakfast number two. Right, this kind of stuff bores people. So, moving on. Around noon, I suited up for a quick jaunt out on the tundra. Ice axe, crampons, gaiters— the whole shebang.

Now the Crawford Path is nothing new to me; I’ve had the privilege of enjoying this trail countless times during my childhood and through my stints with the AMC. But never have I ever hiked Washington in the winter. A once sedge-covered trail buzzing with hikers had become a desolate, wind-scarred expanse, pocked by rime and snow drifts. It was mind-blowingly beautiful.

The Canadian high pushes onward, but it’s still not quite done with us. In fact, today there was scant a cloud to be seen! The State took advantage of this atypical weather and held an avalanche search and rescue (AVSAR) training scenario on the Tuckerman trail. Wanting to help (err… get outside and play with Stacey’s camera), I donned my gear and ventured to the scene of the ”accident.” The AVSAR went off without a hitch, and within minutes, we had the patient packaged and secured at the summit.

Unfortunately, Canada can’t protect us from the remnants of the massive storm that has been wreaking havoc out West. But at least I had a few glory days this shift.

 

Drew Hill,  Summit Intern

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