High Winds, Dense Fog, Bitter Cold Followed By An Awesome Sunset

2013-02-18 19:13:52.000 – Roger Pushor,  Weather Observer/IT Specialist

Sunset through the Weather Room Windows

As can always be expected from the ‘rock pile’, the last few days have been a time of extremes. So far this shift, we’ve seen wind speed ranging from two miles per hour to 129 miles per hour. Temperatures have ranged from a high of 16F degrees to a low of 19F degrees below zero. Visibility from the Observation deck has ranged anywhere from 50 feet to 120 miles. This morning when the winds hit 129 miles per hour and the temperature was 15F degrees below zero, the calculated wind chill was 65F degrees below zero. At those temperatures, exposed skin can start to experience frostbite in less than five minutes.

As I took the picture to the right, I couldn’t help but think how harsh and unforgiving the environment is, just on the other side of those panes of glass and Lexan. From inside the building, you can hear the roar of the wind. Loud pops and bangs can be heard as the concrete and steel rebar of the Sherman Adams building contract at different rates as the outside temperatures get fluctuates up and down rapidly. As you’re outside doing Observations, feeling the wind and cold on your body you quickly realize you can only survive in the beautiful yet hostile environment because of the buildings and gear we have around us.

 

Roger Pushor,  Weather Observer/IT Specialist

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