How Weather Affects Shift Change

2014-02-06 07:05:52.000 – Rebecca Scholand,  Weather Observer/Education Specialist

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As we all know weather can be a tricky animal to pin point. With certainty we can tell when a storm will move over the region, but sometimes it is hard to tell exactly when the heaviest of snow is going to start a day or two out. In our case, this is the situation that we faced with yesterday’s shift change. With observers and volunteers traveling varying distances, a call needs to be made at least a day in advance if we plan to move shift change.

Yesterday the call was made to move shift change up by a few hours in the morning in hopes of avoiding the heavy precipitation and decreasing visibility. All fine and good, but waking up this morning precipitation was just beginning and visibility through shift change remained better than we expected. Realistically we may have been able to keep shift change at the regular time; however, when considering all the commutes of observers and volunteers, it’s a tough call to make.

While my shift is relieved, as this ensures we are able to make it off the summit today, it wouldn’t be possible without the cooperation of the upcoming shift. Even though we only see each other on Wednesdays, we do really work together for the overall benefit of the summit staff.

Observer Note:This upcoming weekend at the Weather Discovery Center, Weather Observer Rebecca Scholand and Snow Ranger Frank Carus will be giving a presentation on Backcountry Awareness. The program starts at 6pm and is free for the public. Hope to see you there!

 

Rebecca Scholand,  Weather Observer/Education Specialist

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