Marty the Star

2008-10-10 18:01:20.000 – Brian Clark,  Observer

Getting filmed

The Observatory was visited by the media yet again today. Generally, media that comes to the summit is interested in the weather and the work that the summit staff does. Sometimes these stories digress to talk about how we live on the summit, but that is typically just a side story. This time was different. This time the main story was Marty, our cat.

Four people from Powderhouse Productions arrived on the summit this morning to get footage and interviews for a show called Cats 101, which will air on Animal Planet sometime in the near future. The particular show of that series that the production company was here to film for is on Maine Coon cats, which as far as we can tell, Marty is.

Obviously the film crew got a ton of footage of Marty. At one point, they said that out of all the shows for Cats 101 they have filmed so far, Marty was the easiest cat to work with. I have to admit there were a few times that it would have been nice if Marty was a lap cat that would just sit where I wanted him to. I really can’t complain though because overall he behaved extremely well. All that work looking cute in front of the camera and the hot lights must have made him a bit thirsty. It also tuckered the little guy out; as I write this, Marty is busy recuperating on the couch in the living quarters. What a rough life New England’s top cat leads.

A few interviews with us humans were filmed as well. Myself, Cara Rudio (our relatively new Marketing and Communications Coordinator), as well as Virginia Moore, former Observatory staff member and current executive director of The Conway Area Human Society(where Marty came from) were interviewed through the course of the day.

I think that the segment of the Maine Coon show involving Marty and the Observatory is going to turn out really good. We will be sure to let you know the exact date the show is going to air as soon as we find out!

 

Brian Clark,  Observer

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