Melted summit and new snow on the way…

2007-03-16 08:23:21.000 – Jim Salge,  Observer

Storm arrives just in time…

Morning dawned clear and remarkably calm at the Observatory this morning, allowing the staff as well as the overnight EduTrippers to survey the changes that occurred on the peak during the past few days in the fog.

Temperatures yesterday began at 39 degrees, and combined with the strong winds and dense fog, melted a significant amount of the summit snow pack. Granted, with the well below normal snowfall this season, combined with the windy conditions of February, there wasn’t much snow pack above treeline to begin with, but the bareness of the tundra is significant! Then temperatures took a nosedive, falling to 10 degrees by nightfall, freezing up all the slush, and depositing a little rime, leading to the picture this morning.

Sunrise today occurred during the proverbial calm before the storm, with winds gusting as high as 9mph. Light filtered through high clouds over the summit, but the sun was shining brightly over Maine, allowing this dynamic scene to the east. Thanks to Rene Pollrich, a researcher from Germany currently on the summit, for the picture.

As we look ahead through the day today, we will see increasing clouds, but snow should hold off until this evening. Then we’re gonna get it! Three shifts in a row now with significant coastal snowstorms at the summit of Mount Washington. An nice streak of incredible weather by the week at the summit for sure … but a small part of me though wishes I was also enjoying atleast one of these storms from the slopes of one of the fine area ski resorts. Hey Wildcat, leave one ungroomed for me…I’ll see you Wednesday!

 

Jim Salge,  Observer

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