Mount Washington Sunsets

2018-07-14 18:19:23.000 – Simon Wachholz, Summit Intern

 

When I woke up 5am Wednesday morning for shift change, my first thought was that I couldn’t wait until my next off week so I could finally sleep in. Once I got back to the top, however, I quickly forgot why I would ever want to leave. The cool air is an amazing reprieve from the summer heat in the valleys and the views of the surrounding towns, forests and mountains are unmatched. Whenever I’m up here, my favorite part of the day is without a doubt sunset. As day progresses into night, the mountain is transformed from a bustling tourist destination to a quiet, serene mountaintop. Additionally, I was able to witness a few amazing sunsets so far this week too.

On Wednesday a perfect amount of altocumulus clouds were illuminated by the sun setting on the horizon. Looking toward the southeast, I also saw some anticrepuscular rays caused by the shadows of the altocumulus. The rays are actually parallel, despite appearing to converge because of an optical illusion created by the increasing distance.

 

Wednesday’s sunset and anticrepuscular rays

Thursday’s sunset was slightly subdued by distant clouds. However, some remnant smoke from wildfires in Siberia caused the sun appear as a faded red ball, even somewhat resembling the appearance of Jupiter.

 

Thursday’s sunset

Clouds approaching the summit from the West cut the sunset short Friday evening, but the view was still amazing with the sun illuminating some fog passing near the summit.

 

Friday’s sunset

The summit has returned to the clouds today, so it looks like there won’t be much to photograph tonight, although I’ll have my camera ready for whenever we do clear out of the clouds again.

 

 

 

Simon Wachholz, Summit Intern

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