NO SNOW?

2010-02-12 17:49:25.000 – Nick Lovejoy,  Summit Intern

Sun Pillar

Well at least it was sunny and warm (12F) today!

The sun always seems to put a smile on the faces of the Observatory staff, even if every footfall outside ends in a teeth jarring crunch. Did Brian mention in yesterdays comment that we haven’t gotten much snow in a while? In case you missed it let me reiterate, we haven’t gotten much snow for a while.

Am I bitter? Of course not!

So what if Charleston, South Carolina is supposed to get snow tonight. So what if the mid-Atlantic recently got hammered with more snow than they know what to do with. And, so what if all we’ve gotten recently was some rain a few weeks ago to melt away any snow we did have. Ok so maybe I’m a little bitter.

It’s not all bad though. Temperatures in the region have been consistently cool allowing ski mountains to blow some of their own snow. The last few days have even provided us with some sunshine and panoramic views, which is a treat considering the mountain is in the fog about 60% of the time. Earlier this afternoon Brian and I got the chance to take a few turns on what I will today refer to as the “East Icefields“. Going down was slick and crusty, and going up was slow and crunchy, but it was great to get outside and enjoy the mild conditions.

I speak for everyone up here at the summit when I say that my fingers are crossed that March will bring oodles and oodles of the white fluffy stuff, but until then all we can do is knock on wood.

 

Nick Lovejoy,  Summit Intern

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