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2010-05-07 16:32:10.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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‘No singing, no dancing, no chick flicks!’ Those are Steve’s rules. I am the primary offender; Drew is in a close second. My affinity for musicals, singing and dancing is directly correlated to my upbringing. My dad used to make up songs on his guitar and my mom always had music on and was always singing. My brother was in a band; my sister and I would act out songs from The Sound of Music and Grease. So, a public apology to Steve and anyone else who has had to endure a random outburst of song from me (I know, there are a lot of you). It’s been especially bad this week. In addition to the extra long shift week, I am about to embark on my vacation. The first entire week I’ve taken since December of 2008. I’d say it’s about time! In an attempt to bargain, I offered to write a comment and Steve has graciously allowed me to sing today. I definitely got the better end of that deal.

In other news, a worker-train for the Cog Railway came up today! They haven’t opened anything up to visitors yet, but that is just around the corner. As we all know, the weather can be a bit fickle in the White Mountains (to say the least), but we’re usually pretty confident in our ability to interpret forecast model data. We’ve actually had our wind forecasts completely blown (haha, get it) a few times this past week and a half. I do wonder if some of those predictions may have been a result of wishful-forecasting. Our winter intern, you all know him as Drew, has yet to witness a 100 mph wind on the summit of Mount Washington. Maybe our desire for our intern to witness a century wind gust clouded our judgment regarding the models.

Even though it is supposed to get windy again tomorrow night, it’s not going to get any where close to 100 mph, and gusts barely exceeding hurricane force will just have to suffice. I wonder if reverse psychology works with the weather?

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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