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2010-04-28 15:36:31.000 – Winnie Jones,  Summit Volunteer

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This is my first time volunteering up here on Mount Washington and I have to admit I was prepared to experience “the worst”. We have had 5 out of 7 days with sunshine, little wind and plenty of warmth. Each day Robin (the seasoned volunteer) and I walked or hiked, starting off slowly and doing the Lake of the Clouds hike yesterday. What fun it was to slide down part of the way, using our feet to slow us. The visibility has been between 50-100 miles, not counting our second day here and today, with zero visibility.

To be up here for this amount time and be part of the routine of the Mount Washington Observatory has been a gift. Yes, we have chores like cooking and cleaning but there is more than enough time to explore, check out the weather room, read, write and relax. Sitting up here at 6,288 feet does feel surreal at times as I glance around the 360 degree view, trying to identify different landmarks. Everything seems small, yet vast. Reading of the history of this region and the era where a person traveled by horse and buggy still amazes me. As a child I did come up the Cog Railroad and well remember the thrill of the ride and the change in temperature as we came up in summer clothes, soon to be shivering at the summit. We have encountered hikers who trekked up here on Saturday which was a stunning, warm day. Strange to see hoards of people up here after days of solitude. I can only imagine what the summer must be like up here.

I have been inspired and in awe of the sunsets and sunrises with the light dancing across the mountain peaks and valleys. Each passing minute brings more astounding colors like a painter with an unlimited palette. I have loved taking pictures and writing of time here. It has been wonderful being here with Robin, Brian, Ryan and Mike, hearing stories of their time here and other travels. Thank you for a great week!

 

Winnie Jones,  Summit Volunteer

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