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2009-11-16 07:56:24.000 – Mary Ellen Dunn,  Summit Intern

Lenticular Clouds at Sunrise.

The unseasonably mild weather on the summit the past few days had brought some hopes of possibly breaking a few temperature records, specifically on Saturday and Sunday. The record for November 14th was set in 1937 at 45 degrees, for November 15th the record was set just last year at 48 degrees, and the record for the month of November was 52 set in 1982.

On Saturday the summit was in the fog all day and was pounded with rain as winds were blowing strong from the southeast. Temperatures slowly increased throughout the day to a maximum of 47 degrees and indeed breaking the long standing record for November 14th!

Yesterday we were excited and hoping for another record breaking day. The forecast models had yesterday clearing out of the fog by afternoon and temperatures rising close to 50 degrees. Reaching this would have definitely broken the record for November 15th but a few degrees higher and it would have broken the record for the month. Well, yesterday didn’t turn out to be as warm as we were all hoping. The summit remained in the fog for most of the day not really allowing the sunshine to reach us. Temperatures didn’t reach the high we were hoping for BUT we were able to get just warm enough to tie the 2008 record with a maximum of 48 degrees!

Things have considerably changed now as a cold front passed over the region early this morning. I woke up to howling winds of close to 70mph and temperatures which have dropped into the twenties. This is more like it!

 

Mary Ellen Dunn,  Summit Intern

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