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2009-07-10 07:28:59.000 – Amy Terborg,  Summit Intern

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On my off shift this past week I decided to fly back home for the Fourth of July. It was raining and cloudy as I drove to Manchester, and it was raining as my flight took off. When I got to Michigan it only rained the first day, but then it was warm and sunny for the rest of the time. It was quite a nice surprise to have this bright thing shining in my eyes and warming my skin. Then early Tuesday morning I returned to New Hamsphire and, what do you know, it was still raining.

However, the weather has been turning around this shift. Last night I came up to the weather room and it was clear outside, the lights from Gorham and Berlin shining brightly. This morning we are in the clear with visibility at 110 miles. I can already tell it’s going to be one of those days where looking out the window and anticipating our after shift hike is far more appealing than actually getting anything done. My pile of B-16’s though, aren’t going to finish themselves.

So, I guess it’s back to work for me. Oh, and happy birthday Mom!!!

 

Amy Terborg,  Summit Intern

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