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2009-06-24 10:32:40.000 – Tom Soisson,  Summit Volunteer

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Hi, my name is Tom and I am the volunteer at MWO for this week. I am here because I thought that it would be an interesting place to spend some time. And it is. The views and the weather are very interesting. Also, as an ex-science teacher, watching the laboratory work and being able to ask endless questions of the staff is fun. In exchange, I have to cook. I’m not a cook. After 6 days I’m sure the staff has figured that out. In my mind it’s a necessary chore, like mowing my lawn. And so I thank the observers Ryan, Bryan, and Mike, the interns Hedda and Alex, the museum staff Sharon, and the AMC outdoor educator Casey for being so kind as to say ‘Thanks Tom, that was pretty good’ after each meal. I just hope no one loses too much weight this week.

My favorite day so far has been Sunday, when I had a chance to get outside and do some hiking and some work. I walked down to the 6 mile mark on the auto road and rebuilt about 15 roadside posts along the way. The posts are about 6 feet long and held up by rock piles. In winter the snow cats use them to locate the road. The posts blow over in high winds. This was during the annual road race and the view was great,an undercast(looking down at the clouds), seeing the runners come up out of the clouds into the sunshine at the summit.

My biggest surprise so far has been the number of hikers that come through in bad weather. I’ve been watching this for several days now. Bad means 40-60 knot winds, temperatures in the 40’s, and lots of moisture. I’d call it rain but it seems to be moving mostly sideways or up. You get very wet in a very short time, along with being blown off of the slippery rocks. But the hikers seem to handle it.

Now I’m looking forward coming back to see this in winter.

 

Tom Soisson,  Summit Volunteer

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