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2009-06-12 17:09:42.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

Much like Aesop’s fables, one often finds him or herself learning valuable lessons on the summit of Mount Washington. Sometimes the lessons are humorous and light (like don’t kneel on a glass-topped table). Others leave a slightly stronger flavor behind, lingering for years (once you’ve been zapped, you don’t want it to happen again). Well, this week, more definitively, the past two days, has left that particular flavor in my mouth.

On Wednesday Steve, Amy, Mike C, and Scott hiked to the Lakes hut to ensure that the data-logger was working properly. With that fixed, we were able to see that the temperature and humidity sensor was reporting a chilly -40 degrees F and a fairly arid RH of 0%. It became apparent that another trip to Lakes should occur, and quickly. So, Scott and I took a quick hike down and climbed on the roof. I stood on the chimney for a while, replacing the sensor hoping that a strong breeze wouldn’t come any time soon. Upon arriving back at the summit, the sensor was reporting an RH of 93% (good) and a temperature of 240 degrees F (bad, very bad). The summit staff all agreed that it must be the wiring somewhere.

Today, we tested the supposedly broken sensor to find it reading correct values. Well, one would imagine the lesson learned. But Wait! There’s more! The summit recently received a new camera for the distance learning program. We hooked it up, only to find a pretty, bright blue screen looking right back. After tracing wires and trouble-shooting, the culprit was a tiny switch.

So, hopefully all who enjoy the daily comments will take something away from this; check your wiring!

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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