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2007-11-30 18:28:32.000 – Karen Thorp,  Summit Intern

Super Sonic Speed

Today has been filled with shoveling, de-icing, and electrical wiring. The shoveling and de-icing took place despite the extremely cold temperatures (0.2 °F) and high winds with gusts up to 79 MPH. The combination of the two parameters dropped the wind chill down to -36 °F. Working outside for five minutes easily chills you to the bone. All skin from the nose to the toes must be adequately covered to prevent rapid frostbite. Regardless of the artic conditions, we ventured outside to manually remove snowdrifts from exits, take hourly observations, and to have a little fun.

This afternoon as the winds subsided to around 30-40 MPH we armed ourselves with our new (and graciously donated) sleds and headed outside. There was a couple of spots with enough snow and ice to provide a few decent runs. We were all in motion as our current volunteer (a professional photographer) Katherine MacDonald snapped pictures.

 

Karen Thorp,  Summit Intern

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