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2007-08-04 08:24:26.000 – Brian Clark,  Observer

Our Polycom videoconferencing system – used for Li

Kids say the darndest things. I certainly found this to be the case yesterday while I was giving two Live from the Rockpile presentations, which Ryan mentioned yesterday in his comment, to a large group of young ones down at our Weather Discovery Center in North Conway.

“Do you eat the snow up there?” was one question.

“Where do you put your shoes?” was another.

One particularly observant child (maybe we should consider him for our open observer position!) apparently noticed my voice sounded funny and asked, “Do you have a cold?” He hit the nail on the head with that one.

Although the summit itself was spared from any thunderstorms yesterday evening, the crew was treated to quite a lightning show after sunset. There were a lot of strong storms in the distance to our north and northeast that were producing a significant amount of lightning for several hours. Ryan tried to get a picture, but the lightning began to dissipate as soon as he went outside with the camera.

The Auto Road will be opening at 4:30 a.m. tomorrow, allowing visitors to drive up to the summit to view the sunrise. I especially wanted to draw attention to this since our forecast calls for the summits to be in the clear with mostly clear skies above. So long as this forecast holds true, those that make the early morning journey up the road will actually be able to see the sunrise. Exactly how good of a sunrise it ends up being depends on the quantity and type of clouds in the sky, as well as how much haze limits visbility. Either way, in my book any sunrise, or sunset for that matter, that we can actually see is a good one!

 

Brian Clark,  Observer

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