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2006-10-12 07:13:27.000 – Ken Rancourt,  Meteorologist

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Changes, changes, changes. If you don’t like the weather just wait a minute! When I began my shift three hours ago we were in dense fog, moderate rain, and had relatively high winds. By 8 this morning we are in the clear, there are lots of ‘neat’ clouds below the summit, and the winds have dropped off considerably.

There are two low pressure centers just to our south (one over Boston, the other over Portsmouth) and they will move up through Maine and the Gulf of Maine later today. When that happens things will change again: temps will definitely fall into the mid 20’s and the winds will shift and will rise up to the 60’s. So, I guess you could say that things will be changing…

Winter may be just around the corner for the higher elevations as there is a chance of snow showers for later tonight. If nothing else, by tomorrow morning we should see some rime ice accumulations on the summit.

 

Ken Rancourt,  Meteorologist

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