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2006-03-29 08:07:53.000 – Tim Markle,  Chief Observer

The celestial hunting season is drawing to a close. Orion, who has been closely stalking Taurus across the night sky all winter, is now at the western horizon just after dusk. Taurus has all but disappeared, and the only signs of winter remaining are Orion’s faithful canine hunting companions, Canis Major and Canis Minor.

With the winter season drawing to a close, we focus our attention on the likes of Leo, the lion, dominating the night sky. Even by early morning this constellation is setting below the western horizon, bowing to the rising constellations of Scorpius and Sagittarius. Like the Phoenix, the rise of this pair signals the rebirth of the summer season, now only two and a half months away.

The weather this week will echo the signals from the heavens. Temperatures will climb to near 60 degrees in the valleys, and into the mid 30s up on the summit. The azure sky and bright sunshine will make it feel like summer, especially after this past weekend’s dreary, and drizzly conditions. Rain will arrive just in time for the weekend, though. So get out and enjoy the warm weather while you can. If you are outside on a warm, clear night look up and you see the remaining winter constellations drifting towards the western horizon, making way for those of spring and summer!

 

Tim Markle,  Chief Observer

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