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2011-02-28 21:00:59.000 – Mike Carmon,  Staff Meteorologist

A Bit of Drifting…eh?

I have the pleasure of writing the final comment for the month of February. The month has certainly not gone out with a whimper.

While we began the week with 130 mile visibilities and clear skies, the clouds have since gathered, producing snow every day this week.

We are now experiencing (along with the valleys below) our third winter storm of the shift!

Winds have not disappointed either, as we’ve peaked at 103 mph, a mark that was reached on both Friday and Saturday.

As I compose this comment right now, winds are gusting near 90 mph, and we have just gotten rid of a messy mix of snow and freezing rain, along with decent glaze icing, coating every surface on the summit in a shiny sheen. The several inches of snow today have been blown about by the wind, dumping a rather large drift directly in the entrance way to the Sherman Adams building. This has also received its requisite glaze coat, which will make the process of shoveling this drift tomorrow a rather cumbersome one (poor, poor intern!).

With the exception of some windy conditions, the weather will calm down tomorrow, bringing a sunny start to the month of March, with relatively average temperatures. I myself and extremely excited, as the turn of this page of the calendar takes us one step closer to warm weather in the valley. Although conditions will be gradually warming up on the summit, March is still full on winter up here, so don’t by any means let your guard down if planning on a trip up Mt. Washington!

 

Mike Carmon,  Staff Meteorologist

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