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2011-08-14 18:00:57.000 – Peter Strand,  Summit Intern

‘Thanks to my awesome interns’. Thanks Erin!

Looks like it’s time for yet another farewell intern comment. Time really does fly by on the rock pile. It seems like only a short time ago that I arrived on the summit, bright eyed and bushy tailed. Not knowing quite what to expect, I attempted to learn everything I could as fast as possible. I would first like to thank the folks on my shift: Mike, Steve, Rick, Tom, Erin and Stacey. I learned so much from them during my time here. Not a trained meteorologist myself, I was eager to learn as much as possible about meteorology and the weather, and everyone was happy to teach me. Additionally, I learned a great deal about the surrounding area and the rich history of Mt. Washington. I was also pleased to be able to more thoroughly explore the White Mountains during my off time in New Hampshire.

This is not to mention all the very interesting and extreme weather we experienced. From beautiful sunny skies, to 100+ mph winds, we had a little bit of everything. The June icing event stands out in my mind, when the summit was covered in ice for a few days, followed a few days later by the record high daily temperature. Also exciting was the 40 minute thunderstorm last shift that dropped hail over 1 inch diameter and included lightning that struck the summit.

I know that it’s been said many times before, but the Mount Washington Observatory is so much more than just a place of employment, it’s a community. From observers, to trustees, to volunteers, to valley staff, it’s impressive to see everyone come together and work towards the single goal of bettering the missions of the Observatory. This work, of course, is all made possible by the generous support of our members and trustees. So it’s back to college for me, and though I’m sad to leave this great place, I’m sure I’ll be back soon to hike, snowboard, or just say ‘hi’.

 

Peter Strand,  Summit Intern

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