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2010-12-19 23:36:36.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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Two weeks ago, Kristin wrote about Sundays being sunny. Once again, Sunday lives up to its name! After the Steve’s first observation, he started telling me how beautiful it was outside. I immediately dressed for outside and went to check it out for myself.

I was not disappointed! Cool, crisp air of 6 degrees, nearly calm winds, and an undercast set the tone for my star-gazing experience. The undercast blocked a lot of the light pollution from the surrounding valleys and, like people who are obsessed with the weather, I looked up. A brilliant planet to the east quickly caught my eye and I was able to make out Ursa Major, Ursa Minor, Draco, and Cassiopeia.

I wish my night-time photography skills existed, because the view was spectacular and I know the website visitors would have enjoyed seeing something other than weather pictures. I also wish my macro photography skills existed. The snow that fell was fine, light, and looked like the decorative ‘snow’ used for the miniature winter villages. When I picked it up, I could see the individual flakes.

At least we have some pictures! Jen and Kristin were able to enjoy sunrise and an afternoon stroll today! It’s a good thing they’re getting a couple of good-weather days this week, since (as Mike mentioned) it will sadly be their last as interns. Thank you both for all of your hard work, dedication, and giggle fests!

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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