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2010-12-18 23:15:50.000 – Mike Carmon,  Staff Meteorologist

A Festive Obs

With Christmas fast approaching, the mood on the summit has taken a much more festive tone. Our living quarters have been decorated with stockings, trimmings, lights, and even a pint-sized Christmas Tree with a tiny Santa to match (atop the TV). Our volunteers this week, Charlie and Jeanine, have provided us with a steady stream of sweet treats, which have kept all of our moods at a sugary high.

The weather outside is not quite frightful, however, as winds have been nothing short of feeble for the first half of this week, and only an inch or two of snow has fallen. After our memorable trek up amidst cold and snow on Wednesday, the weather has failed to impress. It looks to remain tranquil as well, with high pressure moving in for the next couple days. A few days ago, it looked as if New England could see its first major Nor’easter of the season. However, the low pressure area decided to take a path well out to sea, and the only effects it will grace us with are a few high clouds.

Even if the weather is not quite as severe as some of us would like it, a sunny, calm day with a summit blanketed in rime and over a foot of snow will probably provide a great opportunity for a sunrise and sunset viewing, and may even allow a few of us to get out for a hike!

With the week half over, we are also preparing to bid farewell to our summit interns, Jen and Kristin. Kristin has been with us since May, and Jen has been part of our shift since August. They have become familiar faces to us, on and off the summit, and we will miss their helping hands quite a bit (despite the giggling and singing that they additionally provide). Since this is most likely the last you’ll be hearing from me this week, I’d like to say good luck to them, and Merry Christmas to the rest of you!

And what do I want for Christmas? A record-setting wind gust. That’s all.

 

Mike Carmon,  Staff Meteorologist

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