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2010-12-05 15:14:14.000 – Kristin Raisanen,  Summit Intern

A sunny summit!

For our last 3 shift weeks, Sunday has really lived up to its name. During our mostly cloudy weeks, it always seems that Sunday is the day when the clouds break and we see the sun making the day aptly named Sun-day. Today was no different.

This morning I was shocked to hear we were mostly in the clear and that the sunrise would be visible. When I looked at the forecast last night the possibility of seeing a sunrise this week seemed slim, but there it was, sunrise. In fact, Mike, our staff meteorologist, forecasted for cloudy skies and snow showers today. I’m honestly kind of glad he was wrong. Other than the temporary break from the fog for about 30 minutes on Thursday, we have been in the fog since we arrived on Wednesday. Last week was very similar. We started our week and were in the fog until Sunday for the sunrise.

Due to the lack of Vitamin D in my mountain life, I opted for a little photo-tour this morning so I could soak in some of the sun. The coating of ice and snow on the summit looked lovely against the bright blue sky. We had a pretty thick layer of undercast that kept the valley cloudy and did not allow for any beautiful mountain views up here on the summit, but the lingering fog just below the summit allowed for a consistent fog bow to be present and even visible on the North view webcam (it’s the bright strip). Jen and I even decided it was a great day to take a stroll down the auto road to bask in the sun a little. Though the sun will leave us and the fog and snow showers roll back in a little later tonight, it was nice while it lasted.

 

Kristin Raisanen,  Summit Intern

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