Packing for Work

2013-06-12 16:36:55.000 – Mike Carmon,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

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‘Is it Tuesday already?’

That’s usually the phrase that runs through my head when I wake up on an off-Tuesday. My mind immediately goes to work, consolidating what I need to get done before heading up to the summit for a work week.

One of the most important tasks is packing gear for the week. Depending on the time of year, the process varies greatly.

In the summertime, I’ll check the models for the upcoming week on Tuesday, looking to see if I’ll need to supplement my normal warm weather gear with some additional cold weather items in preparation of cold snaps. Although summer is generally much milder and placid on Mt. Washington, an isolated winter day is never out of the question. During these days, gloves, hats, goggles, heavier coats, winter boots, and traction are entirely necessary, so I must plan eight days in advance.

In the wintertime, even though much more gear is required, the process is actually much simpler. I can fully expect to be met with a barrage of harsh winter conditions, so my line of thought is, bring everything! Thick winter gloves, a wool hat, goggles, a balaclava, snow pants, long johns, a down jacket, mid-layer fleeces, base layer items, thick wool socks, winter boots, a headlamp, microspikes, crampons, and an ice axe will all be packed up for a week of wintertime fun!

 

Mike Carmon,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

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