Rises and Sets

2014-08-25 07:32:02.000 – Mike Carmon,  Weather Observer/Education Specialist

A Kitty’s Silhouette

In a location with a reputation for extreme weather, specifically blustery winds, this shift-week has proven decidedly tame on the summit of Mount Washington.

Since our shift arrived last Wednesday, we’ve maxed out at a scant 34 mph, which occurred during Friday’s wee hours. To add to the unusually-calm conditions, our average wind direction for the week is oddly-noteworthy as well, with most of our winds this week coming from the east-northeast. These are, generally speaking, the most uncommon wind directions at our weather station, meaning four consecutive days with these winds is a bit on the peculiar side.

To add to the uniqueness of this shift, the scenery throughout this week, when we haven’t been ensconced in fog, has been dramatic. There have been several notable sunrises and sunsets throughout the previous five days, which has made for some exceptional viewings amongst our entire shift. Even Marty, our (in)famous kitty, has joined the party most nights, posing with his perpetual grandeur amongst the rocks atop the rockpile.

We’re taking in the calm, clear, and relatively mild conditions, though, because as the sun rises and sets, so do the seasons, and summer is beginning its gradual set, as winter will begin to rise and reveal itself in a matter of weeks.

 

Mike Carmon,  Weather Observer/Education Specialist

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