Science In The Mountains 2014 Schedule

2014-07-07 18:28:58.000 – Ryan Knapp,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

Through the lens: This mornings sunrise.

Observer Note: Our Current Summit Conditions page will be undergoing maintenance and may be periodically displaying erroneous data or become unavailable. Until the page is fully restored, hourly summit conditions can be found online HERE or anywhere else online that displays METAR data for station KMWN.

This summer, the Mount Washington Observatory will be hosting our sixth annual Science in the Mountains lecture series. There will be six different programs that will be hosted each Wednesday starting July 16 and running until August 20. Each program starts at 7 pm EDT at our Weather Discovery Center located at 2779 White Mountain Highway, in North Conway, NH. And the best part is, they are all FREE! So we hope to see you there!

The scheduled topics are as follows:

July 16: Complexity of Weather Forecasting in the Presidential Range
Unique challenges faced by forecasters in predicting the weather in the Presidential Range of the White Mountains presented by Educational Specialist / Weather Observer Mike Carmon.

July 23: Weather Through the Lens
Mount Washington’s unique weather told through the stunning photography of longtime Meteorologist / Weather Observer Ryan Knapp.

July 30: Forecasting Wind Gusts at Mount Washington
The complexities of forecasting wind direction, speed, and gusts at the summit of Mount Washington, NH presented by Meteorologist / Weather Observer Tom Padham.

August 6: Exploring Seasonal Variability of Mount Washington’s Temperature Inversions
Seasonal cycles in temperature found along the vertical profile of Mount Washington presented by Educational Specialist / Weather Observer Kaitlyn O’Brien.

August 13: Severe Weather in the White Mountains
The different kinds of severe weather found in the White Mountains of New Hampshire.

August 20: Fall Migration in the White Mountains
The migration patterns of birds living in the White Mountains and the challenges they face while migrating south for winter.

 

Ryan Knapp,  Weather Observer/Meteorologist

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