Shoulder Seasons

2010-09-05 20:15:54.000 – Mike Finnegan,  IT Observer

For being 35F, foggy, and with the occasional rain shower, there sure were a lot of people up on the summit today. They came in all manners, up the Cog, the Auto Road, or hiking. I believe it was the hikers that looked the coldest for when it is just above freezing and raining, there isn’t much one can do to stay warm. It is also days like today when rocks are slippery and it takes surprisingly little for an injury to come along. Put these two elements together and it is a perfect opportunity for hypothermia and a rescue. The good news is that everyone that is spending the night up here is still inside the building. As far as I know, no one was injured or so hypothermic they couldn’t go any further and so we remain dry and warm as well. It is that time of year when it is sunny and warm in the valley and wet, cold, and windy on the summit. It is a good idea to start thinking about winter on the summit and to be prepared to spend a night out in such conditions if need be. We on the summit will do our best to provide an accurate outlook for the next 36-hours, but mountain weather is fickle and seems at times not to care what we think. It is going to do what it’s going to do, regardless of what we say or whether or not you are prepared for it. So for all those folks who love the mountains as much as I do, thank you for making good decisions.

 

Mike Finnegan,  IT Observer

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