Snow Stalactites

2012-03-05 15:27:06.000 – Rebecca Scholand,  Operations Assistant

Inside the Snow Cave

It is not all too often that we have winds from the south but when we do it makes for some interesting drifts in places we need to shovel. Yesterday as I made my rounds after a previous day of snow and southerly winds I found many drifts that needed removal. The entrance way to the Sherman Adams building had several deep drifts, but nothing to complain about. Outside and around the building was a different story.

One of the entrances to the tower that is closed off in the winter but shoveled in case of an emergency has an enclosed walkway for about seven feet off the side of the tower. At the entrance to this walkway a wall of snow had accumulated at the opening leaving a clear space behind up to the door. After I shoveled an opening and climbed behind I had the feeling I was in a cave. Not just because I was enclosed in with only a small open but because of a different surprise.

The grating that was the roof of this walkway had since iced over on the top, however the underside allowed for a grid work of snow icicles to form. These snow icicles grew down from the top of the overhang like stalactites. They were all different sizes and hung so delicately that brushing them with your hand cause them to crumble. Standing behind the wall of snow that had formed and looking up at the snow icicles made me realize how incredible the wind can be to create this snowy cave.

 

Rebecca Scholand,  Operations Assistant

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