Some nice changes

2009-03-14 16:24:03.000 – Ali Boris,  Summit Intern

Lenticulars to the east

My second favorite type of Mount Washington weather (next to, of course, over 100 mph winds and only a little precip hitting your face) is sunny with a few clouds. This morning, we woke up to a big, beautiful lenticular cloud formed by the W winds blowing over the summit. It was accompanied by a sky tinted light orange and pink, and glistening ice cover over the nearby mountain peaks.

With the exception of some partial clouds, the next few days will be sunny and “balmy” mid teens to low twenties on the summit. These conditions are unusual for any length of time, but several high pressure systems moving in and out of our area will bring us some great weather for hiking, walking around the summit, and hopefully watching sunrises and sunsets.

In other news, Marty has been especially friendly for the past couple days. While he continues to have a play mode, a fritz mode, and can’t really be considered a “lap cat”, his softer side is showing through. He enjoys a good scratch when you walk by, and even consents to being held now and again. Most surprising of all, he’s started purring regularly. It might be the weather, or maybe he’s just simmering into adult cat-hood. In any case, this new “Itty Bitty” is a nice change.

Happy Pi Day, and Happy Birthday, RK!

 

Ali Boris,  Summit Intern

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