stop and smell the roses

2008-06-26 11:34:07.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer

perfect reflections

“Stop and smell the roses.” It’s a very popular phrase, indicating that one shouldn’t rush through life. One should appreciate the beauty that unfolds around them, much like how the petals of a rose unfold as it blooms. Every so often, during my off shift week, I will travel to home, sweet, home… New Jersey. The trip is populated with highways, by ways, some long and windy roads, and even a few bridges, not to mention tolls and a couple of somewhat painful trips to the gas pump. It’s a long ride, about 482 miles (but who’s counting) and it can take anywhere from eight to ten hours, depending upon traffic. I do this mostly to visit my boyfriend and family, who have graciously accepted the fact that I am a weather freak and they must compete with weather for my love. I’ve taken this trip countless times since beginning my stint as a weather observer, and have always admired the beauty of Chocorua Lake and the view it provides. It is amazing frozen, in the dead of winter, covered by snow. It reflects the starlight perfectly on a calm, clear night. Usually, I just turn my head to catch a quick glimpse and hope no cars are on the road because I inevitably veer a little into the other lane.

Well, yesterday, just at twilight, I happened to be driving on Route 16, past Chocorua Lake. The image that was before my eyes inspired me to “stop and smell the roses”, and I just had to try to capture the beauty on my camera. So, the moral of the story is that I should stop more often and take more pictures during my road trips.

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer

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