The return of the uh…sun ball.

2007-04-11 07:41:16.000 – Jon Cotton,  Observer

At least there is fog in the background

There is something bright outside this morning and I do not know what it is. It pierces my eye in such an unusual manner than I can’t help but feel like I should be inside. I looked the bright thing up on Wikipedia and apparently it is called a ‘sun’. Well, you learn new things every day as a weather observer. I’ll be going down to the valley today to explore more of this phenomena. Well, actually what can be expected is more like sleet and freezing rain tomorrow. For those in New England, if you want snow come to the mountains and bring your skis.

In the last eight days, this shift has experienced 1 full hour without any fog and 4 additional hours with some sort of clearing during the sixty minute span. Until this morning, we have had only 5 hours without snow, making a week’s total of 23.4″. All that from a low pressure that didn’t move much. But there you go. Most of that snow was due entirely to low level moisture below the peak and consistent orographic lifting squeezing the snow out of the cloud.

There was something nice about being cocooned in a shroud of gray with light snow falling around. Now at the final end of the shift week, I have the opportunity to come to terms with a new, brighter and bigger world. From this vantage point, I think this must be what a blue tarp looks like from underneath.

 

Jon Cotton,  Observer

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