Time flies!

2010-08-09 17:26:37.000 – Brian Clark,  Observer and Meteorologist

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It never ceases to amaze me how quickly time passes when you live and work on a mountain for 8 days at time. It’s already August, and that means that we start to see a drop in average daily temperature that then continues into the next calendar year. In fact, this coming Thursday August 12 is the first day the average daily temperature drops, from 49 to 48 degrees. Of course, this means that winter is just around the corner!

If time didn’t already go by quickly enough, it will go by even quicker for me over the next month. When I leave on Wednesday I am starting a vacation, which because of our week on, week off schedule means that I will be off for three weeks straight. So, I will leave the mountain on August 11 and not return again until the calendar has flipped once again and all of a sudden it’s September.

By the time I return, we will have a new fall intern, the sedge will be noticeably more brown, and the average daily temperature will have dropped even more to 45 degrees!

 

Brian Clark,  Observer and Meteorologist

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