trials

2009-08-08 16:21:10.000 – Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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When the going gets tough, the observers generally take out their frustrations with a crowbar. However, with the obvious lack of icing this week, using a crowbar might not be the best way to deal with difficulties. By difficulties, I mean the summit will soon be short-staffed. We’ve already had to deal without Amy (she had to return to school), and Marty is not handling her absence too well. As Mike mentioned in his comment yesterday, he will be heading to that valley below to go to Virginia Beach for vacation. This will leave us with two observers, one intern, one museum attendant, and two volunteers. Then, due to unfortunate circumstances, our museum attendant Deb will be leaving the summit on Sunday.

This is one of those times when our crew will pull together and work more like a family than coworkers. Like a family pulls together to deal with trials, we will do the same to keep the Observatory running as smoothly as possible. I also mean that we can face these challenges head on, deal with it one step at a time and come out on the other side slightly changed, hopefully for the good. That is how people grow and learn, by extending beyond their limits in knowledge and comfort.

Even though we might be dreading the slightly longer hours and additional work load, we will approach the situation with smiles, level-headedness, and an abundance of optimism.

On a totally different subject, it’s time to write a bit about the weather. Yesterday’s weak cold front left the summit at its best: cold and windy! We recorded a gust of 72 MPH and we actually tied our daily record low for today, 32 degrees F. Brrr!

 

Stacey Kawecki,  Observer and Meteorologist

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